Tag Archives: Löw

World Cup Daily – International Press

Das Bild (Germany): Germany’s most popular tabloid reacted with glee to Die Mannschaft‘s victory over England. Das Bild proclaimed, “Jungs, we love you!”, a reference to the Jogi Löw’s young side and their phenomenal performance against the Three Lions.

Die Welt (Germany): Jetzt sind Deutschland and England quitt” (Now, Germany and England are even):

Die Welt described Frank Lampard’s controversial effort as ‘revenge for the Wembley goal’, referring of course to Geoff Hurst’s equally contentious strike against West Germany in 1966. In that case, the goal was given when perhaps it should not have been. The broadsheet prints a dizzying and unconventional match report, which emphasises the dream-like quality the result had for German fans.

The Mirror (United Kingdom): “FABIGO”


The Mirror pulled no punches in its evaluation of the defeat. Fabio Capello, they say has to go. The Mirror bemoans the new contract offered to the former Real Madrid manager just before the tournament which, they say, will entitle him to a vast sum in compensation.

The Sun: “Time to go Fabio. Clear off and take your players with you.”

The Sun also subscribes to the idea that the Italian is at fault while also offering partial blame to the players who they say “shamed the shirt”. The Sun argues that England’s results in the Group Stage were indefensible, referring to the 1-0 victory over Slovenia as “scraping through”, despite having praised Capello and England after that particular performance in previous editions.

El Universal (Mexico) : Se van de la peor manera – Un gol que no debió contar abre el camino de la debacle tricolor y la despedida para varios veteranos que no volverán a un Mundial”

“Gone the worst way – A goal that should not have been opened the way for the tricolour’s meltdown and a farwell to several veterans who will never grace the World Cup again.”

The Mexican broadsheet criticises Italian referee, Roberto Rosetti, for allowing Argentina’s opening goal which was shown to be clearly offside. The World Cup ended for Mexico where it had all begun in , Soccer City. El Universal bid its farewell to Blanco, Perez, Torrado and Rafael Marquez and damns the Argentine performance as showing ‘no spectacular football’.

It was an all too familiar end for El Universal. The newspaper drew parallels with Mexico’s demise in 2006, also at the hand of the Albiceleste.

De Telegraaf (Netherlands): Column Cruijff: Chili neemt rol Nederland over

In his regular and always insightful column, Johan Cruyff states that he believes that Chile have taken over the Netherlands’ role as a ‘trendsetter’ of beautiful football. Cruyff lends his ardent support to Marcello Bielsa’s side which he says create more chances than anyone else and entertain more fans than any other side at this World Cup.

Cruyff also considers the new push for technology in football in the wake of yesterday’s events. He firmly believes that goalline video technology is fine but in other instances, such as offside, handball etc, Cruyff firmly believes that technology should be avoided. The former Barcelona manager argues that football is a ‘game of mistakes’ and that placing too much emphasis on video technology would hinter the sport rather than help it.

And finally

The Daily Mail, which in the lead up to England v Germany purveyed a lot of copy offensive to Germans took it a step further in the aftermath of England’s 4-1 defeat to Jogi Löw’s side.

Outspoken, right-wing columnist Richard Littlejohn had this to say:

And finally….again:

Our old friends in the New York Post have been at it again. Following the United States’ 2-1 defeat to Ghana after extra-time, ‘The Post’ has this to say about The Beautiful Game.


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Serbia hold on to upset Germans

The College View’s Niall Farrell was on hand to watch Serbia record their first victory at this summer’s World Cup against a much fancied Germany.

Unfancied Serbia got their first win of the World Cup with an effective performance against a German side unlucky not to equalise.

The first ten minutes saw few genuine chances, with both sides displaying a lack of conviction. One notable chance came after seven minutes as Lukas Podolski cracked a shot into the side netting.

As Philip Lahm arched a dangerous cross into the Serbian penalty area, Nemanja Vidic could only head as far as Podolski on the edge of the box. Podolski hit the ball powerfully with the outside of his foot but it fell wide of Vladimir Stojkovic’s goal.

The match did seem to have a streak of ill-discipline as four yellow cards were issued by the twenty-first minute.

Mesut Özil was dynamic as ever, and had a chance on twenty-one minutes with a header at the near post from a corner but the ball was cleared away by Neven Subotic.

Germany played a pressing game with the emphasis on attack, but Serbia couldn’t find a way to mount real attacks of their own within the first thirty minutes.

For all their lacklustre attacking, Serbia did do a great job of keeping the German attack, in particular Miroslav Klose, quiet. Klose was denied an space to move and the Serbs moved quickly to close down the Germans when they advanced into their third of the pitch.

The Germans had a succession of goal chances in the thirty-third and thirt0fourth minutes. Philipp Lahm played the ball to Bastian Schweinsteiger, who attempted a cross to Miroslav Klose three yards from goal on the left side. Left with no clear shot on goal, Klose was forced to head in back across goal but Vidic hoofed the ball clear.

Klose was the centre of attention again as he charged back and put in a clumsy tackle on Dejan Stankovic. Already on a yellow card, Klose was given his marching orders by referee Alberto Undiano Mallenco.

Serbia used the momentum gained from the sending off to get the upper hand in a match that had previously been swinging Germany’s way.

A free-kick was launched down the right wing to Milos Krasic who crossed to 6’’7’ Nikola Zigic at the far post. Zigic jumped and knocked the ball back for Jovanovic, who was able to finish past Manuel Neuer in goal for Germany.

A frantic finish for the first half ensued as a German corner was palmed away by Stojkovic only to find Sami Khedira. Khedira hammered the ball past the helpless Stojkovic, but it thundered back out after hitting the inside of the crossbar.

Thomas Müller tried an overhead kick as the ball came to him, but the ball was dramatically cleared off the line by a Serbian defender.

Germany came out from half time with a renewed vigour and desire to get an equaliser, and had their first chance of the second half nine minutes after the break. A German cross found Mesut Özil just outside the box, but Özil left it for Podolski to strike a fine shot at goal. Vladimir Stojkovic got in the way for Serbia to prevent a fantastic goal.

Özil’s class was again on show as he cleverly played Podolski in yards from goal with a clever flick. Podolski’s fierce shot again went into the side netting.

The tempo of the match went up a few notches subsequently. On fifty-nine minutes a German attack yielded a seemingly innocuous cross, which Nemanja Vidic foolishly handballed. A penalty was awarded, but Lukas Podolski’s poor shot was saved capably by Stojkovic to keep the scores level.

Serbia reversed the seemingly endless tide of German attacks after sixty-six minutes as Milos Krasic forged a chance out of his charge down the right wing.

Krasic passed to Jovanovic, whose shot came back out off the left post as Manuel Neuer looked beaten.

Nikola Zigic continued the theme of Serbian shots hitting the post on seventy-three minutes, as his close-range shot came off the upright and rebounded out.

Referee Undiano was a major talking point, as his rate of giving both free-kicks and yellow-cards dramatically slowed down in the second half, despite several tough tackles.

Serbia spurned a number of chances to kill the match off, with two clear chances from Jovanovic and Zigic in the seventy-fourth minute wasted.

Germany’s seemingly relentless drive for an equaliser lulled a bit in the following minutes, despite the introductions of the energetic Marko Marin and Cacau.

With less than three minutes remaining, a defensive lapse from Arne Friedrich let Milos Krasic go behind the defensive line and play the ball to substitute Gojko Kacar, but Kacar’s cross went well over the waiting Zigic.

Radomir Antic’s Serbia secured a famous victory through efficient defensive organisation, as well as a degree of luck that Germany weren’t in a finishing mood. The group is now delicately poised, with Ghana still to play Australia in the second round of fixtures. A victory there would take the Black Stars to the top of the group.

Özil pens German statement of intent

Germany 4-0 Australia

Germany’s latest World Cup adventure is off to the ideal start. The three time World Cup winners defeated the Soccerroos by a four goals and perhaps could have won by an even greater margin. The Australians, who enthralled fans en route to a place in the Round of 16 in 2006, must now plan for the game against Ghana without the talismanic influence of Tim Cahill. The Everton midfielder was harshly shown a red card by Mexican referee Marco Rodríguez for a mistimed lunge at the legs of Bastian Schweinsteiger.

The rout was initiated early on. Lukas Podolski’s form in the Bundesliga was a matter of huge concern for the passionate followers of Die Nationalmannschaft, but his powerful finish past Mark Schwarzer in the eighth minute quelled any uneasiness surrounding his inclusion in the starting eleven. The move began with Mesut Özil defying the Australian midfield before sliding a precise through-ball in the direction of Thomas Müller. The Bayern München forward pulled the ball back across the goalmouth where it was met by the onrushing Podolski who promptly opened the scoring with a forceful effort through the hands of Mark Schwarzer.

From that point Germany were the only team displaying any meaningful attacking impetus. Müller and Özil were at their inventive best. The duo, both members of the Under-21 side that captured the European Championships in 2009, and Podolski operated in an impressive three man line behind Miroslav Klose.

Klose’s selection was another contentious issue for the German public. So much so that Jogi Löw was forced to defend the Bayern München Stürmer in the build-up to this fixture after he had failed to instill confidence following wasteful displays in the World Cup warm-ups.

It would have been forgivable to believe that Klose’s dreadful form would continue when he lashed a perfect cross from Lukas Podolski high and wide little more than twenty minutes into the game. Klose’s grimace perhaps betraying a lack of confidence. Redemption was swift. A wonderful cross from the deep-lying Philipp Lahm drew Schwarzer foward where he was beaten to the ball by a brave header from Klose, doubling Germany’s advantage on the half hour.
The intrepid Mesut Özil was unlucky not to add to the tally shortly after. Another dazzling passage of play saw the Werder Bremen starlet clip the ball over Schwarzer only to see it sliced off the line by Lucas Neill. With the first half ending, Germany continued to forage for a third goal. Bastian Schweinsteiger and Sami Khedira combined attacking intent with their defensive duties as they persisted in attempting to force passes through a brittle Australian defence.

Any faint hopes of a SoccerRoo revival were scotched ten minutes into the second half. Tim Cahill, playing as Australia’s lone striker, lunged clumsily at the feet of Schweinsteiger and was promptly dismissed by the Mexican referee. Television replays suggested that the decision was a harsh one.

The red-card any lingering Australian attacking intentions and allowed Germany decelerated the tempo. Captain Philipp Lahm continued to move the ball forward while the Polish-born pair of Podolski and Klose demonstrated the same chemistry that was so compelling in the 2006 tournament. The twosome combined magnificently just after the hour mark before Schwarzer denied Klose, who failed to make further indentations into the World Cup goalscoring record of Ronaldo.

Klose was soon substituted by Joachim Löw and replaced with Cacau. Müller crowned his enthralling display with a well deserved goal in the 67th minute. Podolski marauded towards the Australian penalty area. He laid the ball off tidily to Müller who dragged the ball away from Scott Chipperfield before emphatically powering a low shot against Schwarzer’s right post and into the goal.

3-0 soon became four. The recently introduced Cacau scored his first international goal as the architect, man of the match Özil, squared precisely for the Stuttgart striker. Cacau’s first-time effort beating the goalkeeper and adding a justifiable gloss to the scoreline.

Marin and Gomez were brought on with the day’s business concluded. Jogi Löw is certain not to dwell on the implications of this handsome victory beyond the forthcoming showdown with Serbia, who were outplayed and beaten by Ghana in the group’s earlier fixture.

The 4-0 margin was little more than Germany deserved. The warm feelings generated in the Bundesrepublik by their passage to the Semi-Finals in 2006 may be replicated if they can continue to present further exhibitions of glorious teamwork and one-touch passing. For a side that was so ravaged by injury in the weeks preceding the tournament this performance was an impressive reminder that once a World Cup has started, die Nationalmannschaft will always rank amongst the chief protagonists.

Squad announcement round-up

Italy: Marcello Lippi has removed Marco Borriello and Giuseppe Rossi from his World Cup squad.

Goalkeepers- Gianluigi Buffon, Morgan De Sanctis, Federico Marchetti

Defenders- Fabio Cannavaro, Giorgio Chiellini, Gianluca Zambrotta, Domenico Criscito, Christian Maggio, Salvatore Bocchetti, Leonardi Bonucci

Midfielders- Gennaro Gattuso, Andrea Pirlo, Mauro Camoranesi, Daniele De Rossi, Angelo Palombo, Simone Pepe, Riccardo Montolivo, Claudio Marchisio

Forwards- Alberto Gilardino, Vincenzo Iaquinta, Antonio Di Natale, Fabio Quagliarella, Giampaolo Pazzini

United States: Veteran USMNT stars Sacha Kljestan and Brian Ching were omitted from the final 23-man roster by coach Bob Bradley. The final 23 is noteworthy for being perhaps the most experienced United States squad ever assembled. The decision to leave out Ching was apparently influenced by the unavailability of Charlie Davies, as Bradley sought to replicate Davies’ pace through young strikers Herculez Gomez and Robbie Findley.

Goalkeepers: Brad Guzan (Aston Villa), Marcus Hahnemann (Wolverhampton Wanderers), Tim Howard (Everton)

Defenders: Carlos Bocanegra (Rennes), Jonathan Bornstein (ChivasUSA), Steve Cherundolo (Hannover), Jay DeMerit (Watford), Clarence Goodson (IK Start), Oguchi Onyewu (AC Milan), Jonathan Spector (West Ham)

Midfielders: DaMarcus Beasley (Rangers), Michael Bradley (Borussia Moenchengladbach), Ricardo Clark (Eintracht Frankfurt), Clint Dempsey (Fulham), Landon Donovan (Los Angeles Galaxy), Maurice Edu (Rangers), Benny Feilhaber (AGF Aarhus), Stuart Holden (Bolton), Jose Torres (Pachuca)

Strikers: Jozy Altidore (Hull), Edson Buddle (Los Angeles Galaxy), Robbie Findley (Real Salt Lake), Herculez Gomez (Pachuca)

South Africa: Veteran Benni McCarthy has been denied the honour of representing Bafana Bafana in a World Cup on home soil. Coach Parreira’s decision was linked with McCarthy’s declining fitness, with rumours suggesting that McCarthy’s body fat index registered at over 24%.

Goalkeepers: Itumeleng Khune (Kaizer Chiefs), Moeneeb Josephs (Orlando Pirates), Shuaib Walters (Maritzburg United)

Defenders: Siboniso Gaxa (Sundowns), Anele Ngcongca (Genk), Aaron Mokoena (Portsmouth), Matthew Booth (Sundowns), Bongani Khumalo (SuperSport United), Siyabonga Sangweni (Golden Arrows), Tsepo Masilela (Maccabi Haifa), Lucas Thwala (Orlando Pirates)

Midfielders: Teko Modise (Orlando Pirates), Lance Davids (Ajax Cape Town), Reneilwe Letsholonyane (Kaizer Chiefs), MacBeth Sibaya (Rubin Kazan), Thanduyise Khuboni (Golden Arrows), Kagiso Dikgacoi (Fulham), Steven Pienaar (Everton), Siphiwe Tshabalala (Kaizer Chiefs)

Strikers: Surprise Moriri (Sundowns), Bernard Parker (FC Twente), Katlego Mphela (Sundowns), Siyabonga Nomvethe (Moroka Swallows)

Germany: The injury ravaged Germany squad was announced by Jogi Löw yesterday afternoon. Jerome Boateng, the brother of Ghana’s Kevin-Prince Boateng, was included in the squad following injuries to Heiko Westermann and Christian Trasch. FC Bayern München’s Philipp Lahm will captain the side in the absence of Michael Ballack.

Goalkeepers: Manuel Neuer (Schalke), Tim Wiese (Werder Bremen), Hans-Jorg Butt (Bayern Munich)

Defenders: Dennis Aogo (Hamburg), Holger Badstuber (Bayern Munich), Jerome Boateng (Hamburg), Arne Friedrich (Hertha Berlin), Marcell Jansen (Hamburg), Philipp Lahm (Bayern Munich), Per Mertesacker (Werder Bremen), Serdar Tasci (Stuttgart)

Midfielders: Sami Khedira (Stuttgart), Toni Kroos (Bayer Leverkusen), Marko Marin (Werder Bremen), Mesut Ozil (Werder Bremen), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Bayern Munich), Piotr Trochowski (Hamburg)

Strikers: Cacau (Stuttgart), Mario Gomez (Bayern Munich), Stefan Kiessling (Bayer Leverkusen), Miroslav Klose (Bayern Munich), Thomas Muller (Bayern Munich), Lukas Podolski (Cologne)

Michael Ballack ruled out of World Cup

German captain Michael Ballack will miss the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The Chelsea midfielder sustained a tear of the medial collateral ligament of his right ankle in Saturday’s FA Cup Final. The news was broken by the DFB (German Football Association) in a statement released to their website. The results of the MRI scan in Munich on Monday will gravely impact Germany’s preparations for the World Cup.

Die Mannschaft‘s coach Joachim Löw has criticised the challenge that led to the injury. Kevin Prince Boateng, of Ghana, lunged at Ballack with, in Löw’s opinion, “no chance of getting the ball”. The news will boost the chances of Germany’s challengers in Group D; Australia, Serbia and Boateng’s Ghana.

There has been no announcement of a new German captain for the tournament. Fullback Philipp Lahm has acted as a stand-in captain for Germany in the past, while talismanic figures like Bastian Schweinsteiger will also be seen as contenders for the honour.

World Cup Daily: International Press

El País Del Bosque: “No pedemos esparar a todos los lesionados” ( Del Bosque: “We cannot wait for all of the injured”. Another classic babelfish.)

Vicente Del Bosque tells the Spanish media that he cannot include all of Spain’s injured players in his World Cup squad. The news will worry the likes of Xavi, Fabregas, Iniesta and Torres, all of whom are either currently injured or struggling to overcome injuries. Torres, especially, is in danger of missing the World Cup after Liverpool’s club doctor has announced that he may miss the opening fixtures. Moving on to speak about the vacant spot for a third goalkeeper, Del Bosque refuses to name Victor Valdés yet.

La Repubblica <<Lippi e gli assenti “Totti? Vedrete…”>> (Lippi on the absentees, “Totti? We’ll see…”)

Marcello Lippi appears to end the World Cup hopes of Alessandro Nesta and Amauri, who recently declared for Italy. The Azzurri coach hinted that World Cup winner Francesco Totti may yet be coaxed out of international retirement, but we’ll have to wait until the May 11th announcement of another 30-man squad.

Marca La afición ya tiene clara la lista de 23 para el Mundial 2010 (The fans have a clear list for the 2010 World Cup)

A poll of nearly 700,000 voters online have selected what they believe to be Spain’s squad for the World Cup Finals. There is no space for Marcos Senna, David Guiza, Michel Arteta or José Antonio Reyes. The Marca readers squad reads: Casillas, Reina, Valdés, Piqué, Puyol, Ramos, Albiol, Arbeloa, Capdevilla, Marchena, Silva, Xavi, Iniesta, Cesc, Xabi Alonso, Jesús Navas, Pedro, Busquets, Mata, Villa, Torres, Llorente and Negredo.

The New York Times World Cup Gets Closer and U.S. Roster Remains Unsettled

Bob Bradley is not yet decided on his final 23 man squad for the World Cup. He tells The New York Times that 16-18 of the spots are filled at this time. Jermaine Jones, who recently declared for the United States instead of Germany, has been told that he may not be included.

France Football Une liste de 25 dévoilée & Barrios dans la liste de 30

France’s premiere football publication reports on the naming of the training squads of Algeria and Paraguay, with no major shocks in either side.

Die Zeit René Adler fährt nicht nach Südafrika (René Adler will not travel to South Africa)

German goalkeeper René Adler will forgo the World Cup to have rib surgery which might be necessary to prolong his career. The coach of ‘Die Mannschaft’ ,Joachim Löw, was disappointed by the news. The 25 year old goalkeeper, who is rumoured to have been targeted by both Arsenal and Manchester United, said that the decision was hardest of his life. Die Zeit also report on how in-form striker Kevin Kuranyi will not be selected by Löw despite scoring eighteen goals in the Bundesliga so far this season.

And finally
The Telegraph Shakira’s official song ‘Waka Waka’ fails to impress South Africans

Colombian songstress Shakira’s official World Cup song (previously reviewed by World Cup Daily) has not been well received by the South African public. “It’s horrible,” one fan told the Telegraph, “I’m not standing for it. I mean what is our president doing about it?”